Robert D. DiDio & Associates - Criminal Defense
Your First Meeting Is Free
917-300-0984
En Español

STREET CRIME DEFENSE WITH NO JUDGMENT

What can I expect after I’m arrested in New York City?

| Sep 19, 2014 | Theft & Property Crimes |

If you’ve been arrested on criminal charges here in New York City, you or your family may have questions about the process and what to expect. Below is some information that may be helpful to you as you await your trial date.

Am I eligible for a bail bond?

You may be, and if you have a criminal defense attorney working on your behalf, he or she is likely working hard to arrange your release on either a cash bail or a bail bond through a licensed bonding agency.

How long after my arrest is my arraignment?

Under normal circumstances, defendants are usually arraigned within 24 hours of their arrest.

— Can my husband/wife/parents visit me while I’m in police custody? No. Unless you are a juvenile under the age of 16, you are not allowed to have visitors while in custody.

I think I missed my court date. What happens now?

Call your attorney immediately and arrange for him or her to meet you at the central clerk’s office in whichever borough your case is being adjudicated.

I haven’t been arrested, but there is a warrant out for me. What should I do?

The only way a warrant can be recalled or nullified is by a defendant appearing in front of a judge. This, too, requires a trip to the aforementioned clerk’s office with your attorney in tow. Make sure that you have identification with your date of birth listed along with information about the warrant, such as the date of issuance and docket number.

How do I know which courtroom to go to?

There are calendars posted daily in the courthouse lobby that lists defendants by name or docket number. If you don’t see your name, the central clerk’s office will have that information, too.

After an arrest, remain in touch with your defense attorney so that you may be kept abreast of any dismissals, postponements, offers of plea bargains or other developments with your case.

Source: NYCourts.gov, “Frequently Asked Questions” Sep. 18, 2014

In the News
Articles
Review Us