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STREET CRIME DEFENSE WITH NO JUDGMENT

Conrad Murray files criminal appeal after initial denial

| Feb 28, 2014 | Criminal Appeals |

When you have been convicted of a crime and you are innocent, you will likely try everything possible to clear your record of the conviction. Filing a criminal appeal is one way you have to possibly clear your name. For Conrad Murray, the former cardiologist who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter, an appellate court ruling against him wasn’t enough to thwart his effort to prove his innocence.

Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in connection with Michael Jackson’s death, which the coroner ruled was caused by an overdose of propofol. Murray was accused of giving Jackson the surgery-strength anesthetic via an IV drip. Prosecutors claim he didn’t properly monitor Jackson, but Murray claims he gave Jackson an injection and stayed with him until the effects wore off. Murray says that Jackson must have gotten up and given himself an injection of the medication, which was a fatal dose.

An appellate court has already issued a unanimous 68-page ruling that rejected his criminal appeal. He has now filed a petition for a re-hearing. Within 24 hours, the court responded by asking the Attorney General’s office to respond by Feb. 10, 2014. That news is said to have heartened the doctor.

In addition to the criminal appeals, Murray also has an ongoing civil lawsuit to attempt to get his medical license in Texas reinstated. He is working closely with his counsel to ensure that he proceeds properly with his cases. Anyone who is going through the criminal appeal process might have questions about certain aspects. Seeking the advice of a New York criminal defense attorney with experience in appeals might help you to get the answers you need.

Source: New York Daily News, “Conrad Murray resurfaces in exclusive photo as Michael Jackson’s former doctor works hard to keep his criminal appeal alive” Nancy Dillon, Feb. 05, 2014

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